"Age of Extinction" Power Attacker Lockdown Toy Review

in 2014, Action Figure Review, Age of Extinction, Decepticon, Power Attacker

Age of Extinction

Lockdown General Information:
Release Date: November 2014
Price Point: $12.99 (Varies by retailer)
Retailer: General Release (Toys R Us, K-Mart, Target etc.)
Accessories: Missiles x 2

Images:

*Images above with asterisks (*) and text below in italics are from Amazon.com:
Gear up for power-punching action with the Power Attackers! This mighty Lockdown Power Attacker figure converts from robot mode to vehicle mode, just like Lockdown always has. But when he's in robot mode, his missile blast attack will pound any Decepticon who gets in his way into scrap! When he needs speed more than strength, he converts in 9 easy steps to high-speed sports car! Convert and attack with your Lockdown Power Attacker! Transformers and all related characters are trademarks of Hasbro.*

*There is some "boiler plate" text used for these descriptions, so errors such as Lockdown blasting Decepticons slip through now and then.

Lockdown is one of the key characters in "Age of Extinction". While Galvatron did pose a significant threat in the film, Lockdown proved himself to be a formidable foe, requiring Autobots and humans alike working together to defeat him. I've already reviewed the One Step Changer and Deluxe versions of this character. This figure represents a middle ground between those two, fitting into the "Power Attackers" line with a focus on an action feature and simpler transformation scheme than the Deluxe figure (but more complex than the "One Step Changer").

Robot Mode:
Of the various versions of Lockdown I've reviewed so far, this is perhaps the one that makes the most design compromises to accommodate the transformation and action feature. A lot of this compromise comes in the form of the proportions of the robot mode. Lockdown was fairly bulky (but not "fat") in the film. He looked like a formidable character just walking on screen and his battle prowess was displayed a couple of times in the film. This figure has some odd design elements. The arms form the rear of the vehicle, so the outside of each arm has car panels on them that make the arms look bulkier than one would expect. The lower legs form the front of the car, and the way the parts form the legs give his legs an odd look, as if he is walking with his legs pushed into the middle a bit. The feet form part of the doors of the car mode, so they're rather large, making it look almost like he's wearing big shoes.

Now I don't want you to think that I'm totally down on this figure. I sort of wanted to get all the bad/weird stuff out of the way first. The thing is, there's actually a lot of really nicely done detailing here. Lockdown's CGI model is very intricate, with lots of machinery and armor panels forming the parts that make up his body. Many of those details show here as well. This includes the distinctive engine parts on his chest (and the small "shield" detail where the Lamborghini logo would be), the layers of armor that wrap over parts that include pistons and springs. The sculpt is quite intricate, especially around the torso and thigh areas. The head sculpt represents Lockdown with his "night vision" mask down, which gives him an extra creepy appearance. There are oddities to this sculpt, but I can't fault the detailing.

Lockdown is cast in silver, black and metallic orange plastic. The silver makes up most of the figure with orange and black making up smaller parts like the wheels and missiles respectively. One seemingly odd color choice is the use of metallic orange on the left knee area. This is partly to call out the action feature of the figure, but it sticks out a bit like a sore thumb against the silver color on the rest of the leg. Paint details are done in silver, metallic blue and green. The silver is used on parts like the thighs, arms and torso. The shade is different so it doesn't just blend into the silver plastic. Metallic blue is used on some of the armor bits that are layered on top of other sculpted details such as some of the angled details on the thighs. The green is used for the "faceplate", a callback to his "night vision" used in the movie. Aside from the odd orange panel on the knee, I really like the deco for this figure. I was surprised at some of the more intricate details such as the metallic blue.

There are four points of articulation on this figure, which actually makes it a bit less articulated than other Power Attackers. The articulation is focused in the arms. Since the missile firing gimmick is activated by moving the legs they lose articulation. Still, the action feature is rather cool. Press the legs together and you'll feel the tension. Once you squeeze to a certain point the missile packs on his back will swing up. At the same time the launching triggers press against the shoulders, causing the missiles to fire. This action feature is based on an actual ability the character has in the movie. In the film Lockdown fires missiles from launchers built into his upper arms. This is based on that feature, but these launchers are significantly larger. It's a fun feature and it works consistently. There is one other detail which is not addressed in the packaging. The left leg has a small, round metal piece on the bottom. This is meant to interact with larger "Age of Extinction" toys such as the "Stomp & Chomp" Grimlock figure. When you place this figure on Grimlock, certain sounds, lights and features will activate which are different than if you used an Autobot figure. This metal piece is how the figure "knows" which affiliation the character is and which features to activate.

Transformation to Robot Mode:

  1. Make sure each of the missile launchers are swung back and pushed together.
  2. Rotate each robot arm up.
  3. Swing the robot hands together and connect them.
  4. Rotate each of the robot feet out, then swing them down.
  5. Swing the lower legs in, forming the front half of the car.
  6. Push the hood/windshield piece down.

Vehicle Mode:
Lockdown's vehicle mode is a Lamborghini Aventador. I will say up front that in terms of representing the real life vehicle, I think the One Step Changer and Deluxe Class figures do a much better job of representing the vehicle but this figure is distinctive in its own way because it represents the vehicle with all its windows up, the way it appeared in the film. On both the other versions, the side windows are not present (presumably rolled down) and it winds up looking like something was left out by accident. It also features the distinctive shape of the Aventador including the pointed front end, the low profile and the distinctive rear section with layers of panels running down to the back. It also has the distinctive lines and grooves on the doors.

Unfortunately, due to the action feature and the way the figure transforms, there are some oddities to the sculpt. First, the windshield piece is raised a bit over the cabin section. This disconnect is necessary for the missile firing gimmick, but here it looks rather strange. Also at the rear of the vehicle the missiles from the robot mode still show and break the illusion of the vehicle mode partly due to the missiles being orange.

The colors are a bit mismatched in this mode. Most of the vehicle is a dark silver, but silver paint is used on the windows and the doors, so the doors wind up being a shade lighter. Also, the orange plastic piece from the robot mode now sticks out a bit in the front of this mode. Details that do work nicely are metallic blue on the rear half of the vehicle and the silver used for the headlights. There is also a purple Decepticon symbol on the center of the hood.

Final Thoughts:
This is one odd figure. I really love the action feature, and it has some great sculpting. However there are also odd deco choices and a couple design compromises that make it less than ideal. If you can accept those compromises for the feature and having a version of Lockdown then go for this one, but I can see why many fans would not enjoy it. I enjoyed the figure, but I admit it has its faults.